Greenway Announces ‘Playful Perspectives’- Curatorial Theme & Public Art Installations

The Greenway Conservancy (rosekennedygreenway.org) announced three artists who will install works as part of a park-wide curatorial theme of “Playful Perspectives.” The Greenway’s award-winning public art program has commissioned Meredith James, Mark Reigelman, and Aakash Nihalani to install new works over the next 3 months. Installation on two of the works began two days ago.

You won't believe your eyes as The Greenway's new public art installations challenge your perspective. Space of Hope is the fifth Greenway Wall mural in the Dewey Square Park. Coming soon...The Meeting House by Mark Reigelman.

You won’t believe your eyes as The Greenway’s new public art installations challenge your perspective. Space of Hope is the fifth Greenway Wall mural in the Dewey Square Park. Coming soon…The Meeting House by Mark Reigelman.

Playful Perspectives is an exhibition of large-scale, site-specific commissioned works by artists with rising careers whose works playfully and delightfully expose the vulnerability of one’s sense of perspective.

These works manipulate visual perception through the use of scaled objects and optical illusions, blurring the boundaries between art and everyday life, and between expectation and reality.

In addition to the artworks, Playful Perspectives will juxtapose play structures such as tetherball with the landscape of downtown Boston and invite people of all ages to play.

By inserting these works in spaces that thousands of people pass through in the course of their daily routine, the exhibition seeks to reimagine the mundane.

These new works will join two already on display on The Greenway: Spaces Of Hope, painted by artist Mehdi Ghadyanloo as the fifth Greenway Wall mural at Dewey Square Park and Make and Take by Chris Templeman, an in-park 3D-printer running 24 hours a day in Chinatown Park to manufacture roughly 2000 tiny plastic roosters to celebrate the Chinese Year of the Rooster.

“With this unified curatorial theme, we give visitors another reason to walk the length of The Greenway from Chinatown to the North End,” offered Jesse Brackenbury, Greenway Conservancy Executive Director. “With private support, we’re excited to continue to push for public space innovation.”

Each of the artworks shown on The Greenway are privately funded entirely through grants, private donations, and the Conservancy’s earned revenue. For more on how the non-profit Conservancy funds its public art program,