Residents Call for Larger Noise Fines

August 7, 2012
By

City Councilor Sal LaMattina has prepared an ordinance to increase fines for loud noise in the City of Boston up to $300.

On many occasions and at numerous neighborhood meetings residents loudly complained about the outrageous noise stemming from roof-top parties and people passing through the community during late night and early morning hours.

Residents have indicated on several occasions that people that patronize the Waterfront businesses are parading through the North End after the businesses close in that area and the late night North End customers are creating a very noisy atmosphere that is disturbing the neighborhood peace and tranquility.

These people are also causing damage to vehicles and other property, vomiting in doorways and urinating where ever they can, according to residents who want the noise fines to be at least $1,000 and more police arresting these people who are just plain inconsiderate.

Councilor LaMattina and his staff clearly indicated that by law, the $300 fine is the highest penalty that can be handed out.

The Legislature and the Governor would have to change the law to make any increase happen.

“Let’s stop playing around, it’s been long enough to get under control. It’s outta control here (North End). The $1,000 fine should include garbage,” one resident emailed the Councilor.

The concerned citizen also wrote, “Take a walk on a Sunday morning like I do and the vomit and garbage on the street is unbearable.”

The email continues, “And did you ever take a look at the guys cleaning the streets? Paint dries faster than these guys move.”

Another resident emailed the Councilor stating, “The deterioration of our great neighborhood didn’t happen overnight, although it does seem like it at times.”

The message went on to say, “We must be patient and diligent in our efforts to restore the quality of life issues that we are facing and will continue to face as our neighborhood continues to evolve into one of the most vibrant communities in America today.”

The noise problem and the disorderly people have been an ongoing problem. Boston Police have placed manpower in hot spots that residents have requested and/or identified.

Police have spoken to and handed motorcyclists brochures warning them of unnecessary noise.